The Beatles: Paul McCartney, His Father's Influences

There are many songs Paul McCartney wrote to pay tribute to his father’s style of music. His father is musically inclined and also invited Paul McCartney to do the same. Most of the songs in the Beatles catalogue can be easily distinguished as a tribu

There are many songs Paul McCartney wrote to pay tribute to his father’s style of music. Most of the songs in the Beatles catalogue can be easily distinguished as a tribute to his father. Paul McCartney once had a trumpet given by his father which he traded for an acoustic guitar. His father played piano and trumpet. James "Jim" McCartney, Paul’s father is also responsible for sending Paul McCartney to a school so he could study music but Paul McCartney still chose to play by ear just like his father.

When I’m Sixty Four

A song released in the prime of The Beatles, this was actually an early song written by Paul McCartney when he was but a teenager. The presence of horns is heavy in the song, they were the primary instruments used. The song was composed on the McCartney's family piano at Jim McCartney's house 

For No One

The horned instrument that Paul McCartney featured in the song was the French Horn, the instrument used in the solo and as an accompaniment. Alan Civil, the man playing the French Horn was asked by The Beatles to play a note which is higher than the instrument's normal range.

The Fool on the Hill

A different side of Paul McCartney, the way the horn was used is very different. It was playing a very unusual chord which sounded like a ship’s horn (The Chord Progression of the song itself is very unique). The flute was also used in the song although Paul McCartney never really uses a real flute in his concerts.

Got to Get You Into My Life

Although the song is taken as a tribute from Paul long for someone or something (pot), it is also actually a tribute to many things like Motown. The presence of horns makes it somewhat a tribute to Paul McCartney’s father.

Penny Lane

The song was inspired from John Lennon’s memories in Liverpool. The idea of using horns in the song came from a clip Paul McCartney watched. He later hired the man who played and asked him to play for him. The track had lots of trumpet overdubs embedded and used as fills in the song.

With Paul McCartney’s song writing talent he can certainly used any instrument to create a good song. He is actually responsible for the tape loops for Tomorrow Never Knows. Paul McCartney later ventured to Electric Music. This is evident in other songs like Coming Up, What's the New Mary Jane and etc.

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Cheryl Murphy
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Posted on Feb 7, 2012
M 5446
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Posted on Feb 7, 2012